Vram

How the search for simplicity led to a new breakthrough in pump technology.

 

HistoryofV-RAM-Search
The wide “bite” of the Vshaped piston proved to be
extremely effective in capturing the loose material
in the charging chamber and moving it to a pressurized
condition and into the pipe. Furthermore, the backstroke
plowing action of the piston agitated the remaining
material and facilitated the feed into the charging
chamber for the next stroke. It was also apparent that
designing the shape of the hopper for a specific
material was critical in order to achieve
flow into the
chamber.

In the early 1970"s Dave Olson was searching for a better, more efficient and economical way to move difficult-to-handle solid materials.

Mechanical conveying systems and augers were inefficient, inflexible, hazardous and required high horsepower and frequent maintenance. Air pressure systems were expensive, fragile, complex, costly to operate and had to meet rigid safety regulations. They were also limited to well-mixed slurries that required low pumping pressure.

Pumping addressed some of the deficiencies of conveyors, augers and air pressure systems. However, ordinary pumps have difficulty accepting large solids and are more likely to plug up and cavitate. Their complex construction often results in high maintenance costs and their close tolerances make them susceptible to the abrasive action of material being pumped.

The ideal, Olson believed, was a pump which could readily accept a variety of large, solid, unprocessed material and efficiently apply the pressure required to move it through a pipe. It would also have to survive the harsh interaction of abrasive material with the chamber wall, and the piston, or impeller.

HistoryofV-RAM-Search2After extensive research and trial-and-error prototypes, Olson discovered that a V-shaped piston moving within a triangular pumping chamber achieved an unusually high volume of material per piston stroke. The wide mouth created a very high ratio of intake opening size to chamber volume, which provided a fast, unrestricted flow of large, solid materials from the hopper to the chamber.

The wide "bite" of the V-shaped piston proved to be extremely effective in capturing the loose material in the charging chamber and moving it to a pressurized condition and into the pipe. Furthermore, the backstroke plowing action of the piston agitated the remaining material and facilitated the feed into the charging chamber for the next stroke. It was also apparent that designing the shape of the hopper for a specific material was critical in order to achieve flow into the chamber.